ALL POSTS TAGGED: BISHOP



In the Opening Prayer of the Mass on the feast of St. Thomas, we pray, “Almighty God, you granted the martyr Thomas the grace to give his life for the cause of justice” (Sacramentary). The justice Thomas died for was the right of the Church to be free from control by the government.


Read More »



God gave many talents to Saint Ambrose. He used them to keep the Church true to God's Word. In 340 AD, Ambrose was born in Trier, one of Germany's oldest cities. His father served there as an important Roman soldier. When he grew up, Ambrose became a lawyer and was the governor of Milan in Italy.


Read More »



Every year at Christmas, children await Santa Claus. When they get older, they think he is just make believe. But Santa Claus really lived—long, long ago. His generosity is based on a saint who was a great gift-giver.


Read More »




O buona ventura!” If your Italian is a little rusty, in English it means, “Oh, good fortune!” or “What good luck!” Legend claims that these are the words exclaimed by Francis of Assisi when he prayed over the four-year-old Giovanno di Fidanza in 1225. The name “Bonaventure” stuck.


Read More »



Augustine is sometimes called the “Apostle of England.” In the year 596, Father Augustine left his quiet life as the prior of the Benedictine Abbey of St. Andrew in Rome to lead a group of monks to preach the Gospel and bring Christianity to the people of England.


Read More »



Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod’s childhood taught him that money cannot solve all problems. Although his family was wealthy, they were forced to flee France during the French Revolution, leaving all of their possessions behind. It was 1790, and Charles was just 8 years old. His father had been a politician but was forced to become a tradesman in Italy, where they had sought refuge, and the family was very poor. They moved from city to city, making it difficult for Charles to have a good education, other than what was provided by one priest in Venice.


Read More »



When we talk about St. Athanasius, we use two important words–“orthodoxy” and “heresy.” Orthodoxy means right belief. Heresy means false belief.

Athanasius was born in about 297 AD in Alexandria, Egypt. When he grew up, he became the bishop there. Then he spent the rest of his life defending one true belief of the Church–the divinity of Christ Jesus.


Read More »



Anselm’s desire to become a monk led him from his childhood home in Italy to a famous Benedictine monastery in France. He studied the great writers of the Church, including St. Augustine, and spent much of his time teaching and writing important books that explained some of the deepest mysteries of our faith. It is believed that Anselm gave us the term “theology” and defined it as “faith that is seeking to understand.” Anselm was also elected head of the monastery by his brother monks.
 


Read More »



Stanislaus is the patron saint of Poland. Some people call him the second John the Baptist because, like John, Stanislaus stood up for his faith.

Stanislaus was born to a noble family in 1030 in a small town near Krakow, Poland. When he was very young, he told his parents that he wanted to be a priest. They were proud that their son had a calling to serve God. They sent Stanislaus to schools as far away as Paris so that he would have the best training for his ministry.


Read More »



An apostle leaves home and country, family and friends to preach the good news of God’s love. God uses the apostle to reach out to pagans who believe in many gods. They do not know the beauty and goodness of the one true God. The apostle Patrick brought the great good news of the Christian God to the Irish.


Read More »

Pages