ALL POSTS TAGGED: UNITED KINGDOM



Margaret was born in 1555 in England. She was raised as a Protestant, a member of the Church of England, but after her marriage to John Clitherow, she made the decision to become Catholic. It was a brave decision, because Margaret lived during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, who wanted to rid England of all Catholics and the practice of the Catholic faith.


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Anselm’s desire to become a monk led him from his childhood home in Italy to a famous Benedictine monastery in France. He studied the great writers of the Church, including St. Augustine, and spent much of his time teaching and writing important books that explained some of the deepest mysteries of our faith. It is believed that Anselm gave us the term “theology” and defined it as “faith that is seeking to understand.” Anselm was also elected head of the monastery by his brother monks.
 


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In the 14th century, a number of English men and women withdrew from the world. They lived alone as hermits, or anchorites. Their hermitage, or cell, was a small room attached to a local church. Each room had two windows. One pierced the church wall. Through this window, the anchorite received communion. Through the second window, the anchorite received food brought to him or her by village people.


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Bede, or Venerable Bede as he is sometimes called, lived from about the year 673 until 735 in England. But his writings were so great that people still study them today. He was born very close to the monastery in Northumberland where he spent much of his life. His name comes from the Old English word for prayer, so it is possible that his parents always intended for him to enter a monastery. He was sent there at the age of seven to be educated.


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Augustine is sometimes called the “Apostle of England.” In the year 596, Father Augustine left his quiet life as the prior of the Benedictine Abbey of St. Andrew in Rome to lead a group of monks to preach the Gospel and bring Christianity to the people of England.


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Margaret Pole was born in England in 1473 and was the niece of two English kings. Another king arranged for Margaret to marry Sir Reginald Pole, a friend of the royal family. They had a happy marriage.


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Columba (521-597) was born of a royal family in Donegal, Ireland, but he is best known as one of the most famous Scottish saints. He became a monk at an early age and founded monasteries in different parts of Ireland. He was forced to leave Ireland because of a personal feud that turned into a war. Bishops and abbots exiled him from Ireland, and twelve companions from his monasteries went with him.


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In the Opening Prayer on June 22, we pray, “Give us the courage to proclaim our faith by the witness of our lives” (Sacramentary). Thomas More was a man of great faith and courage whose life shows us what it means to be a witness to our faith.


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At the 2010 Mass that proclaimed John Henry Newman “Blessed,” some of the hymns sung were written by that very man. But John was not simply a man who wrote hymns. He was someone who inspired others with his life and his writings.


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Margaret was an English princess who was born around the year 1045. When her country was invaded, her family escaped by boat. They were headed for Hungary, but a storm crashed their ship on the rocky shore of Scotland. The Scottish king, Malcolm III, invited the family to stay at his castle until their boat could be repaired.


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