ALL POSTS TAGGED: GERMANY



Do you remember the parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:29-37? Mother Marianne of Molokai brought Jesus’ story to life in her ministry to the lepers of Hawaii.

Marianne Cope was born Barbara Koob in Germany in 1838. When she was two years old, her family emigrated to the United States, to upstate New York, to find a better life. After 8th-grade graduation, she worked in a factory to earn money to help her family. Her dream of becoming a nun had to be delayed until her younger brothers and sisters could support themselves. She joined the Sisters of St. Francis in Syracuse when she was 24.


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Matilda was from a royal family in Denmark and was raised by her grandmother, who was an abbess in a convent. Matilda became Queen of Germany when she married King Henry I. As queen, she put her faith into action. She treated the people of Germany as children of God rather than her subjects. She was a generous person and wanted all people to share equally in the blessings of life. Her good deeds were an example to King Henry. They worked together to help all the citizens of Germany to have better lives.


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Titus came from a Catholic family in the Netherlands that encouraged the children to actively serve the Lord. Three of Titus’ sisters became nuns, and a brother became a Franciscan priest. Titus was ordained a Carmelite priest in 1905, when he was 24 years old.


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Edith Stein was born in 1891 in Breslau, Poland to a Jewish family. As a child, she was an extraordinary student and in 1916 received a doctorate in philosophy and began to teach at a university. Her family was religious, but Edith had no interest in religion. Eventually she became drawn to the Catholic faith after reading the autobiography of St. Teresa of Avila.

In 1922, she was baptized at the Cathedral Church in Cologne, Germany, and began to teach at a Catholic girls' school. She then taught at a university, but was forced to resign her position by the Nazi government, which was aware of her Jewish heritage.


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At the Mass of his beatification in 2007 in his native Austria, Franz Jägerstätter was remembered as a normal, everyday person with faults. Sometimes he took his faith lightly. He chased after girls, rode a motorcycle, and fathered a child outside of marriage.


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Hildegard of Bingen is believed to have been born in 1098 in Germany. At a young age Hildegard had a very holy teacher named Jutta. From her teacher, she learned to love God and to pray. In those days, it was very natural for Hildegard to join with her teacher, Jutta, and other holy women and become a nun when she was 15 years old. Together these women prayed and worked together in their Benedictine monastery.


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Francis Xavier Seelos was born in Fussen, Bavaria, in Germany in 1819. He was named after St. Francis Xavier, the famous Jesuit missionary. When he was a little boy, Francis’ mother asked him what he was going to be when he grew up. He answered by pointing at a picture of his name saint and said, “I’m going to be another St. Francis.”


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Bernhard Lichtenberg was a Catholic priest who served the people of Berlin at St. Hedwig’s Cathedral during a time of great crisis. Born in 1875 in the Prussian province of Silesia, Father Lichtenberg was ordained to the priesthood in 1899 and witnessed the growing power of the Nazi party and its persecution of the Jewish people. His faith in Jesus Christ gave him the courage to speak out.


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Albertus Magnus was interested in everything. He was fascinated by the relationship between faith and science. He studied astronomy and biology and loved logic and math. He pored over maps and hiked in the mountains to learn more about geography. He was the kind of student who challenged teachers to prepare lessons that satisfied his need to learn.


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There are several saints who have the words “the great” after their names, but St. Gertrude the Great is the only female to have that honor.


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