ALL POSTS TAGGED: BE MY DISCIPLES



Mary was not a quitter. The other disciples ran away afraid, but Mary stayed with some other women at the foot of the cross until Jesus died. She would not leave her friend in the terrible last moments of his earthly life. Sunset was fast approaching, which meant that the Sabbath was about to begin. The rules of her religion said she had to be inside before dark, but she followed Jesus’ body to the tomb. At the first light of dawn after the Sabbath, she rushed to the tomb to anoint Jesus’ body, because there had been no time when he was buried. Mary hurried back to the Apostles to tell them that she had seen the Risen Christ.


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Joachim and Anne were the parents of Jesus’ mother, Mary. We don’t know many details about their lives because they are never mentioned in the New Testament. Everything we know about them comes down through tradition—the stories people told about them.


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Alphonsus was what we call a “gifted” student today. He was a lawyer by the time he was 16 years old! He came from a wealthy family in Naples, Italy, and had every advantage in life from the moment he was born in 1696. But his parents were spiritually devoted people, and Alphonsus was taught that the greatest blessing he had been given was his faith. He prayed often and attended Mass even on days when he was appearing in court.


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John Vianney was born a peasant in Dardilly, France, in 1786. As a youth, John shepherded sheep on his father’s farm. It was during the French Revolution, and it was illegal for Catholics to attend Mass at the time. But the Vianney family traveled distances every Sunday to worship and pray in secret. Because of this, young John saw priests as particularly heroic to the people. Even after the revolution ended, when religion could again be practiced openly, John felt drawn to the vocation of the priesthood.


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Since the beginning of the Church, some people have preached false beliefs. The Church calls these people heretics. It calls their beliefs heresies.


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Edith Stein was born in 1891 in Breslau, Poland to a Jewish family. As a child, she was an extraordinary student and in 1916 received a doctorate in philosophy and began to teach at a university. Her family was religious, but Edith had no interest in religion. Eventually she became drawn to the Catholic faith after reading the autobiography of St. Teresa of Avila.

In 1922, she was baptized at the Cathedral Church in Cologne, Germany, and began to teach at a Catholic girls' school. She then taught at a university, but was forced to resign her position by the Nazi government, which was aware of her Jewish heritage.


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At the Mass of his beatification in 2007 in his native Austria, Franz Jägerstätter was remembered as a normal, everyday person with faults. Sometimes he took his faith lightly. He chased after girls, rode a motorcycle, and fathered a child outside of marriage.


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Lawrence was a deacon in Rome in the early days of the Church; he lived around 225-258,  a time when Christians were harshly persecuted. We know little about him except for a legend that tells us about the remarkable deed he performed a few days before he was martyred


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Clare’s parents wanted a good life for their daughter, who was born in Assisi in Italy in 1194. But what they wanted for Clare was not what Clare had in mind. At age 15 she refused to marry. One day she heard St. Francis, who was also from Assisi, preach. At that moment, she knew what she must do with her life. She knew she wanted to be like Francis. She would live a humble life dedicated to Jesus.


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Raymund Kolbe was born in Poland in 1894. His family was very poor, but they were rich in spirit. In 1914, his father was captured and killed by the Russians for fighting for Polish independence.


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